Beyond Urban Agriculture

The AMPS provides a possible plant-based solution to poor urban air quality and energy overconsumption. The system has the potential to impact the effects of climate change and directly contributes to the realization of SDG 2: Zero hunger, SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being; SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities; SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production; and SDG 13: Climate Action
At the food summit, we have installed a living green wall system called the Active Modular Phytoremediation System (AMPS) to demonstrate the typical edible food plants that are currently been grown within controlled agriculture settings within urban environments.  Besides providing fresh food, building integrated agricultural systems  may contribute other ecosystems services to urban environment such as the remediation of urban heat island effects and  poor air quality. The  living wall shows how food and plant systems might be aesthetically integrated into the structures and systems of healthy and productive indoor environments.

An example of Living Green Urban Infrastructure

Composition of the AMPS

How does the system work?

The AMPS increases the air and water cleaning capacity of plants through mechanically moving water and air across the root structures of the plants. In this way, people experience multiple benefits of naturally filtered air to improve indoor environmental quality and human health and well-being.
Air Quality
Energy

Uses plant materials to filter and clean the air, contributes to SDGs 3 and 11

Contributes to the reduction of energy consumption, which contributes to SDGs 11 and 12
Water

Potential Bioremediation of water systems, contributes to SDGs 2, 3, 6 and 12

Heating & Cooling

Biodiversity

Food 

Health

Aesthetic

Modular

Potential to promote local ecosystems and healthy conditions for organisms to thrive

Enhances local resilience, food security and social capital, contributes to SDG 2, 11 and 12

Physiological benefits and stress reduction increased happiness from biophilia

Provides beauty to the urban and indoor environment

Flexible systems offer a wide range of adaptable and differently scaled installations 

Reduces building cooling energy consumption due to reduced air conditioning loads

What are the potential benefits of

Urban Green Infrastructure?

Beside reconnecting urban populations with nature, building integrated living systems may have multiple benefits that warrant further investigation :

About the edible plants integrated on the green wall

Exhibition

Global Projects

An example of a living green wall system is being demonstrated at the UNHQ to show how edible food plants can be integrated within an urban environment.
At the food summit, we have installed a living green wall system called the Active Modular Phytoremediation System (AMPS) to demonstrate the typical edible food plants that are currently been grown within controlled agriculture settings within urban environments. 
Besides providing fresh food, building integrated agricultural systems  may contribute other ecosystems services to urban environment such as the remediation of urban heat island effects and  poor air quality. The  living wall shows how food and plant systems might be aesthetically integrated into the structures and systems of healthy and productive indoor environments. The AMPS provides a possible plant-based solution to poor urban air quality and energy overconsumption. The system has the potential to impact the effects of climate change and directly contributes to the realization of SDG 2: Zero hunger, SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being; SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities; SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production; and SDG 13: Climate Action

An example of Living Green Urban Infrastructure